In the movie The Princess Bride, Inigo and Fezzik finally find “the man in black” and discover that he’s dead–and Inigo says in that mournful mutter, “Is just no fair.”

That’s how I feel right now.

Because after the year my family and I have had, we just had to get bedbugs.

Because I have to travel so much, I’ve gone crazy over the last year with taking precautions against bedbugs. I encased all our mattresses. I hot-wash and hot-dry every load of our laundry. I bought and use a hotbag. After I travel, *everything* I carry gets put in there and cooked–even my shoes. I cooked my daughter’s stuff after she went to a local hotel recently. I even cook my visitors’ stuff if they’ve been in a hotel on the way to my house.

I ended up killing a bedbug on my couch anyway.

We *think* the bedbug I killed came in with a cardboard box from my husband’s work. We *think* that we caught the lone traveler before it could get a foothold in our house. We *think* the only things we’ll have to clean up will be my living room (no easy task) and my husband’s van.

We *think* lots of things, but only time (and a big fat exterminator bill) can tell us for sure.

To quote one of my friends after hearing about the bedbug, “Well, that sucks.” A side note for you: I’ve only ever heard her use that phrase at her own husband’s funeral. That sure gave me a sense of what she thinks I might be up against.

Is just no fair.

I just got done reading the old classic, When Bad Things Happen to Good People. In it, the author flat says, Yep, bad things happen for no good reason. There is no plan, and adversity isn’t some test forced on us by a sadistic God. As Patton Oswalt might say, It’s chaos. Be kind. The author also says it’s helpful for people to claim for themselves, Yep, this sucks and it really isn’t fair. I did nothing to deserve this.

He’s absolutely right. That *is* helpful to me right now.  Bedbugs and cancer really aren’t fair, and I did nothing to deserve this.

Is just no fair. And that idea helps me accept this mess more easily.